MySQL Workbench 6.2.3 GA has been released

Dear MySQL users,

The MySQL developer tools team announces 6.2.3 as our GA release for
MySQL Workbench 6.2.

MySQL Workbench 6.2 is the new version for the official MySQL
graphical development tool .

MySQL Workbench 6.2 focuses on support for innovations released in MySQL
5.6 and MySQL 5.7 DMR (Development Release) as well as MySQL Fabric 1.5,
with features such as:

  • A new spatial data viewer, allowing graphical views of result sets
    containing GEOMETRY data and taking advantage of the new GIS
    capabilities in MySQL 5.7.
  • Support for new MySQL 5.7.4 SQL syntax and configuration options.
  • Metadata Locks View shows the locks connections are blocked or waiting on.
  • MySQL Fabric cluster connectivity – Browsing, view status, and connect
    to any MySQL instance in a Fabric Cluster.
  • MS Access migration Wizard – easily move to MySQL Databases.

Other significant usability improvements were made, aiming to raise
productivity for advanced and new users:

  • Direct shortcut buttons to commonly used features in the schema tree.
  • Improved results handling. Columns have better auto-sizing and their
    widths are saved. Fonts can also be customized. Results “pinned” to
    persist viewing data.
  • A convenient Run SQL Script command to directly execute SQL scripts,
    without loading them first.
  • Database Modeling has been updated to allow changes to the formatting
    of note objects and attached SQL scripts can now be included in forward
    engineering and synchronization scripts.
  • Integrated Visual Explain within the result set panel.
  • Visual Explain drill down for large to very large explain plans.
  • Shared SQL snippets in the SQL Editor, allowing multiple users to
    share SQL code by storing it within a MySQL instance.
  • And much more.

The list of provided binaries was updated and MySQL Workbench binaries
now available for:

  • Windows 7 32 and 64bits
  • Mac OS X Lion or newer
  • Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04 64bits
  • Fedora 20 64bits
  • Oracle Linux 6.5 64bits
  • Oracle Linux 7 64bits
  • Sources for building in other Linux distributions. Pre-compiled binaries
    are no longer provided for 32bit Linux distributions, although users may
    still download and build from sources.

Note: Workbench for Windows requires Visual C++ Redistributable for
Visual Studio 2013, which can be downloaded from:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=40784

For the full list of changes in this revision, visit
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/relnotes/workbench/en/changes-6-2.html

For discussion, join the MySQL Workbench Forums:
http://forums.mysql.com/index.php?151

Download MySQL Workbench 6.2.3 now, for Windows, Mac OS X 10.7+, Oracle
Linux 6 and 7, Fedora 20, Ubuntu 12.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 or sources,
from:

http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/tools/workbench/

MySQL Workbench 6.2.2 RC has been released

Dear MySQL Users,

The MySQL developer tools team announces 6.2.2 RC – the final release
candidate for MySQL Workbench 6.2.

MySQL Workbench 6.2 is the upcoming major update for the official MySQL
graphical development tool .

MySQL Workbench 6.2 focuses on support for innovations released in MySQL
5.6 and MySQL 5.7 DMR (Development Release) as well as MySQL Fabric 1.5,
with features such as:

  • A new spatial data viewer, allowing graphical views of result sets
    containing GEOMETRY data and taking advantage of the new GIS
    capabilities in MySQL 5.7.
  • Support for new MySQL 5.7.4 SQL syntax and configuration options.
  • Metadata Locks View shows the locks connections are blocked or waiting
    on.
  • MySQL Fabric cluster connectivity – Browsing, view status, and connect
    to any MySQL instance in a Fabric Cluster.
  • MS Access migration Wizard – easily move to MySQL Databases.

Other significant usability improvements were made, aiming to raise
productivity for advanced and new users:

  • Direct shortcut buttons to commonly used features in the schema tree.
  • Improved results handling. Columns have better auto-sizing and their
    widths are saved. Fonts can also be customized. Results “pinned” to
    persist viewing data.
  • A convenient Run SQL Script command to directly execute SQL scripts,
    without loading them first.
  • Database Modeling has been updated to allow changes to the formatting
    of note objects and attached SQL scripts can now be included in forward
    engineering and synchronization scripts.
  • Integrated Visual Explain within the result set panel.
  • Visual Explain drill down for large to very large explain plans.
  • Shared SQL snippets in the SQL Editor, allowing multiple users to
    share SQL code by storing it within a MySQL instance.

  • And much more.

The list of provided binaries was updated and MySQL Workbench binaries now available for:

  • Windows 7 32 and 64bits
  • Mac OS X Lion or newer
  • Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04 64bits
  • Fedora 20 64bits
  • Oracle Linux 6.5 64bits
  • Oracle Linux 7 64bits
  • Sources for building in other Linux distributions. Pre-compiled binaries
    are no longer provided for 32bit Linux distributions, although users may
    still download and build from sources.

For the full list of changes in this revision, visit
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/relnotes/workbench/en/changes-6-2.html

For discussion, join the MySQL Workbench Forums:
http://forums.mysql.com/index.php?151

Download MySQL Workbench 6.2.2 now, for Windows, Mac OS X 10.7+, Oracle
Linux 6 and 7, Fedora 20, Ubuntu 12.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 or sources,
from:

http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/tools/workbench/

How-To: Guide to Database Migration from MS Access using MySQL Workbench

Edit: added sample table output in MySQL

MySQL Workbench 6.2 introduces support for MS Access migration. This tutorial should help you get your Access tables, indexes, relationships and data in MySQL.

Preparation

Because MS Access ODBC drivers are only available for Windows, migrating from it is also only possible from Windows. As for the destination MySQL server, you can have it in the same local machine or elsewhere in your network.

MS Access stores relationship/foreign key information in an internal table called MSysRelationships. That table is protected against read access even to the Admin user, so if you try to migrate without opening up access to it, you will get an error like this:

[42000] [Microsoft][ODBC Microsoft Access Driver] Record(s) cannot be read; no read permission on 'msysobjects'. (-1907) (SQLExecDirectW)

The steps to grant read access to Admin are explained below. Unfortunately, the Access UI for that seems to change every version, but we’ll cover at least version 2007.

Preparing a Database Under MS Access 2007

  1. Open the database in Access
  2. Under the “Database Tools”, click the “Macro -> Visual Basic” button to open the VB console
    Screenshot 2014-08-19 11.51.40
  3. To confirm that you’re logged in as “Admin”, type the “? CurrentUser” and press Enter, in the “Immediate” panel:

    ? CurrentUser
    Admin

  4. Type the following command to grant access:

    CurrentProject.Connection.Execute “GRANT SELECT ON MSysRelationships TO Admin”

    Screenshot 2014-08-19 11.55.53
  5. Quit

 Open MySQL Workbench and start the Migration Wizard

From the main MySQL Workbench screen you can start the Migration Wizard by clicking on the Database Migration launcher in the Workbench Central panel or through Database –> Migrate in the main menu.

migration_start

A new tab showing the Overview page of the Migration Wizard should appear.

migration_1

 

ODBC Drivers

To check if you have the ODBC driver installed, click “Open ODBC Administrator” to open the system ODBC tool and look at the Drivers tab.

odbcad_access

Important: MySQL Workbench has 32bit and 64bit executables. The ODBC drivers you use must be of the same architecture as the Workbench binaries you are using. So if you’re using Workbench 32bits, you must have 32bit ODBC drivers. Same for 64bits. Because Office 2007 and older was 32bit only and even Office 2010 installs as 32bit by default, you may need to install Workbench 32bits to migrate from Access, even if you have a 64bit machine. If during migration you get an ODBC error about “architecture mismatch between the Driver and Application”, you installed the wrong Workbench.

 

In the User DSN tab, click on Add… to create a DSN for for your database file. For the example, we created one for the northwind sample database.

odbcad_dsn

 

Set up the parameters for your source Access database

Click on the Start Migration button in the Overview page to advance to the Source Selection page. In this page you need to provide the information about the RDBMS you are migrating, the ODBC driver to use and the parameters for the connection.

If you open the Database System combo box you’ll find a list of the supported RDBMSes. Select Microsoft Access from the list. Just below it there’s another combo box named Stored Connection. It will list saved connection settings for that RDBMS. You can save connections by marking the checkbox at the bottom of the page and giving them a name of your preference.

The next combo box is for the selection of the Connection Method. This time we are going to select ODBC Data Source from the list. This allows you to select pre-existing DSNs that you have configured in your system.

The DSN dropdown will have all DSNs you have defined in your system. Pick the one you created for the DB being migrated from the list.

In the Default Character Set field you can select the character set of your database. If your Access version uses western/latin characters, you can leave the default cp1252. However if you use a localized version of Access, such as Japanese, you must enter the correct characterset used by your edition of Office, otherwise the data will be copied incorrectly.

Access source

Click on the Test Connection button to check whether an ODBC connection can be established. If you put the right parameters you should see a message reporting a successful connection attempt.

Set up the parameters to connect to your target MySQL database

Click on the Next button to move to the Target Selection page. Once there set the parameters to connect to your MySQL Server instance. When you are done click on the Test Connection button and verify that you can successfully connect to it.

Target connection parameters

Select the objects to migrate

Move to the next page using the Next button. You should see the reverse engineering of the selected database in progress. At this point the Migration Wizard is retrieving relevant information about the involved database objects (table names, table columns, primary and foreign keys, indices, triggers, views, etc.). You will be presented a page showing the progress as shown in the image below.

Reverse Engineer Progress

Wait for it to finish and verify that everything went well. Then move to the next page. In the Source Objects page you will have a list with the objects that were retrieved and are available for migration. It will look like this:

Source Objects Page

As you can see the Migration Wizard discovered table and view objects in our source database. Note that only the table objects are selected by default to be migrated. You can select the view objects too, but you would have to provide their corresponding MySQL equivalent code later (no automatic migration is available for them yet) so let’s leave them off for now. The same applies for stored procedures, functions and triggers.

If you click on the Show Selection button you will be given the oportunity to select exactly which of them you want to migrate as shown here:

Source Objects Page Expanded

The items in the list to the right are the ones to be migrated. Note how you can use the filter box to easily filter the list (wildcards are allowed as you can see in the image above). By using the arrow buttons you can filter out the objects that you don’t want to migrate. At the end, don’t forget to clear the filter text box to check the full list of the selected objects. We are going to migrate all of the table objects, so make sure that all of them are in the Objects to Migrate list and that the Migrate Table Objects checkbox is checked. Most of the time you’ll want to migrate all objects in the schema anyway, so you can just click Next.

Review the proposed migration

Move to the next page. You will see the progress of the migration there. At this point the Migration Wizard is converting the objects you selected into their equivalent objects in MySQL and creating the MySQL code needed to create them in the target server. Let it finish and move to the next page. You might have to wait a little bit before the Manual Editing page is ready but you’ll end up with something like this:

Manual Editing Page

As you can see in the image above there is a combo box named View. By using it you can change the way the migrated database objects are shown. Also take a look at the Show Code and Messages button. If you click on it you can see (and edit!) the generated MySQL code that corresponds to the selected object. Furthermore, you can double click in a row in the object tree and edit the name of the target object. Suppose you want your resultant database to have another name. No problem: double click on the Northwind row and rename it.

Manual Editing Page Expanded

An interesting option in the View combo box is the Column Mappings one. It will show you all of the table columns and will let you individually review and fix the mapping of column types, default values and other attributes.

Column Mappings

Run the resulting MySQL code to create the database objects

Move to the Target Creation Options page. It will look like this:

Target Creation Options Page

As you can see there, you are given the options of running the generated code in the target RDBMS (your MySQL instance from the second step) or just dumping it into a SQL script file. Leave it as shown in the image and move to the next page. The migrated SQL code will be executed in the target MySQL server. You can view its progress in the Create Schemata page:

Create Schemata Progress Page

Once the creation of the schemata and their objects finishes you can move to the Create Target Results page. It will present you a list with the created objects and whether there were errors while creating them. Review it and make sure that everything went OK. It should look like this:

Create Target Results Page

You can still edit the migration code using the code box to the right and save your changes by clicking on the Apply button. Keep in mind that you would still need to recreate the objects with the modified code in order to actually perform the changes. This is done by clicking on the Recreate Objects button. You may need to edit the generated code if its execution failed. You can then manually fix the SQL code and re-execute everything. In this tutorial we are not changing anything, so leave the code as it is and move to the Data Transfer Setup page by clicking on the Next button.

Transfer the data to the MySQL database

The next steps in the Migration Wizard are for the transference of data from the source Access database into your newly created MySQL database. The Data Transfer Setup page allows you to configure this process.

Data Transfer Setup Page

There are two sets of options here. The first one allows you to perform a live transference and/or to dump the data into a batch file that you can run later. The other set of options gives you a way to tune up this process.

Leave the default values for the options in this page as shown in the above image and move to the actual data transference by jumping to the next page. It will take a little while to copy the data. At this point the corresponding progress page will look familiar:

Bulk Data Transfer Page

Once it finishes, move to the next page. You will be presented a report page summarizing the whole process:

Migration Report Page

And that should be it. Click on the Finish button to close the Migration Wizard.

 

A little verification step

Now that the Northwind database was successfully migrated, let’s see the results. Open an SQL Editor page associated with your MySQL Server instance and query the Northwind database. You can try something like “SELECT * FROM Northwind.customers”. You should get something like this:

Screenshot 2014-08-20 16.57.45

MySQL Workbench 6.2.1 BETA has been released

Dear MySQL Users,

The MySQL Workbench team is announcing availability of the first beta
release of its upcoming major product update, MySQL Workbench 6.2.

MySQL Workbench 6.2 focuses on support for innovations released in MySQL
5.6 and MySQL 5.7 DMR (Development Release) as well as MySQL Fabric 1.5,
with features such as:

* A new spatial data viewer, allowing graphical views of result sets
containing GEOMETRY data and taking advantage of the new GIS
capabilities in MySQL 5.7.
* Support for new MySQL 5.7.4 SQL syntax and configuration options.
* Metadata Locks View shows the locks connections are blocked or waiting
on.
* MySQL Fabric cluster connectivity – Browsing, view status, and connect
to any MySQL instance in a Fabric Cluster.
* MS Access migration Wizard – easily move to MySQL Databases.

Other significant usability improvements were made, aiming to raise
productivity for advanced and new users:

* Direct shortcut buttons to commonly used features in the schema tree.
* Improved results handling. Columns have better auto-sizing and their
widths are saved. Fonts can also be customized. Results “pinned” to
persist viewing data.
* A convenient Run SQL Script command to directly execute SQL scripts,
without loading them first.
* Database Modeling has been updated to allow changes to the formatting
of note objects and attached SQL scripts can now be included in
forward engineering and synchronization scripts.
* Integrated Visual Explain within the result set panel.
* Visual Explain drill down for large to very large explain plans.
* Shared SQL snippets in the SQL Editor, allowing multiple users to
share SQL code by storing it within a MySQL instance.
* And much more.

The list of provided binaries was updated and MySQL Workbench binaries
now available for:
* Windows 7 or newer(32 and 64 bits)
* Mac OS X Lion or newer
* Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04
* Fedora 20
* Oracle Linux 6.5
* Oracle Linux 7
* Sources for building in other Linux distributions

For the full list of changes in this revision, visit
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/relnotes/workbench/en/changes-6-2.html

For discussion, join the MySQL Workbench Forums:
http://forums.mysql.com/index.php?151

Download MySQL Workbench 6.2.1 now, for Windows, Mac OS X 10.7+, Oracle
Linux 6 and 7, Fedora 20, Ubuntu 12.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 or sources,
from:

http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/tools/workbench/

On behalf of the MySQL Workbench and the MySQL/ORACLE RE Team.
Vishal Chaudhary

MySQL Workbench 6.1.7 GA has been released

Dear MySQL users,

The MySQL Workbench team announces availability of version 6.1.7 of its
flagship product. MySQL Workbench 6.1.7 is a periodic maintenance release
including 17 bug fixes. Additionally, the supported Linux distribution list has been
refreshed. Users of the product are recommended to upgrade to this version.

MySQL Workbench 6.1

With over 30 new features, this version has many significant
enhancements focusing on real-time performance assessment and analysis
from the SQL statement level to server internals and file IO. You can
see this from additions to the SQL Editor as well as new dashboard
visualization and reporting that take advantage of MySQL Server 5.6
and 5.7 Performance Schema, and enhancements to the MySQL Explain Plans.

Additionally Workbench 6.1 is leveraging work from various teammates in
MySQL Engineering by introducing a schema called “SYS” that provides
simplified views on Performance Schema, Information Schema, and other
areas.
Special thanks to the server optimizer team, server runtime team, and Mark
Leith. For Oracle DBAs MySQL SYS is similar to the V$ catalog views, and
MSSQL folks its like DMVs (Dynamic Management Views).

MySQL Workbench 6.1 includes:

* Improved drag and drop support in the Home screen and SQL Editor
* Visual Explain 2. The Visual Explain feature was revamped and is now
easier to read and interpret. You can also get the traditional tabular
explain output from within the same interface.
* Performance Dashboard. A graphical representation of some key statistics
from the server status, gives you a bird’s eye view of the status of key
server subsystems.
* For advanced users, Performance Schema Instrumentation. A GUI for
configuring the Performance Schema in detail, for advanced users.
* Performance Schema based reporting. Gives insight into the operation
of the server through many high-level reports.
* New query result view. Get more information about queries you execute,
such as information about the fields in your result set and key performance
statistics from your query (timing, index usage, number of rows scanned,
joins etc).
* Form Editor for resultsets. In addition to the result grid, you can now
edit records row by row in a form style editor.
* Table Inspector. Similar to the Schema Inspector, view detailed
information from tables. A streamlined interface for creating indexes is
also included.
* Support for the Windows accessibility API and Windows high contrast
color schemes. A new high contrast theme has been introduced.
* And more.

More than 60 enhancement requests and bugs reported by users have also been
addressed, providing performance, usability and stability improvements
across the board.

For the full list of bugs fixed in this revision, visit
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/relnotes/workbench/en/changes-6-1.html

For discussion, join the MySQL Workbench Forums:
http://forums.mysql.com/index.php?151

Download MySQL Workbench 6.1.7 now, for Windows, Mac OS X 10.6+, Oracle
Linux 6, Fedora 20, Ubuntu 12.04 and Ubuntu 14.04 or sources,
from:

http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/tools/workbench/

In Windows, you can also use the integrated MySQL Installer to update
MySQL Workbench and other MySQL products.

Quick links:
-http://mysqlworkbench.org/
– Download:http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/tools/workbench/
– Bugs:http://bugs.mysql.com
– Forums:http://forums.mysql.com/index.php?151

MySQL Workbench 6.1.6 GA has been released

The MySQL developer tools team announces 6.1.6 as our GA release for
MySQL Workbench 6.1.

MySQL Workbench 6.1.6 is a maintenance release and contains over 30
fixes and minor enhancements made since the original GA release.

MySQL Workbench 6.1

Introducing over 30 new features, this version has many significant
enhancements focusing on real-time performance assessment and analysis
from the SQL statement level to server internals and file IO. You can
see this from additions to the SQL Editor as well as new dashboard
visualization and reporting that take advantage of MySQL Server 5.6
and 5.7 Performance Schema, and enhancements to the MySQL Explain Plans.

Additionally Workbench 6.1 is leveraging work from various teammates in
MySQL Engineering by introducing a schema called “SYS” that provides
simplified views on Performance Schema, Information Schema, and other
areas.
Special thanks to the server optimizer team, server runtime team, and Mark
Leith. For Oracle DBAs MySQL SYS is similar to the V$ catalog views, and
MSSQL folks its like DMVs (Dynamic Management Views).

MySQL Workbench 6.1 includes:

  • Improved drag and drop support in the Home screen and SQL Editor
  • Visual Explain 2. The Visual Explain feature was revamped and is now
    easier to read and interpret. You can also get the traditional tabular
    explain output from within the same interface.
  • Performance Dashboard. A graphical representation of some key statistics
    from the server status, gives you a bird’s eye view of the status of key
    server subsystems.
  • For advanced users, Performance Schema Instrumentation. A GUI for
    configuring the Performance Schema in detail, for advanced users.
  • Performance Schema based reporting. Gives insight into the operation
    of the server through many high-level reports.
  • New query result view. Get more information about queries you execute,
    such as information about the fields in your result set and key performance
    statistics from your query (timing, index usage, number of rows scanned,
    joins etc).
  • Form Editor for resultsets. In addition to the result grid, you can now
    edit records row by row in a form style editor.
  • Table Inspector. Similar to the Schema Inspector, view detailed
    information from tables. A streamlined interface for creating indexes is
    also included.
  • Support for the Windows accessibility API and Windows high contrast
    color schemes. A new high contrast theme has been introduced.
  • And more.

More than 60 enhancement requests and bugs reported by users have also been
addressed, providing performance, usability and stability improvements
across the board.

For the full list of bugs fixed in this revision, visit

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/relnotes/workbench/en/changes-6-1.html

For discussion, join the MySQL Workbench Forums:

http://forums.mysql.com/index.php?151

Download MySQL Workbench 6.1.6 GA now, for Windows, Mac OS X 10.6+, Oracle Linux 6, Fedora 19, Fedora 20, Ubuntu 12.04 and Ubuntu 13.10 or sources, from:

http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/tools/workbench/

In Windows, you can also use the integrated MySQL Installer to update MySQL Workbench and other MySQL products.

Quick links:

http://mysqlworkbench.org/
– Download: http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/tools/workbench/
– Bugs: http://bugs.mysql.com
– Forums: http://forums.mysql.com/index.php?151

What’s New in MySQL Workbench 6.1

The recently released MySQL Workbench 6.1 continues expanding the capabilities of the tool. This version focuses on performance analysis features for MySQL server workload and queries, taking advantage of performance_schema improvements introduced in MySQL 5.6 and 5.7 DMR.

This is a overview of the new features we’ve added. Some of them are covered in more detail in separate posts.

New Navigator PERFORMANCE Section

The new PERFORMANCE section includes Dashboard, Performance Reports, andPerformance Schema Setup pages. Generally, this new performance reporting feature provides a graphical representation of key statistics from the MySQL server status, and provides an overview of the MySQL server subsystems.

Dashboard

View server performance statistics in a graphical dashboard.

Figure 2.1 Performance Dashboard

Performance Dashboard

Performance Reports

Performance schema based reports that provide insight into the operation of the MySQL server through many high-level reports.

Figure 2.2 Performance Reports: Top I/0 By Bytes

Performance Reports: Top I/0 By Bytes

Performance Schema Setup

A GUI for configuring and fine tuning the Performance Schema instrumentation. Initially, this loads an “Easy Setup” page that is enough for most users. Slide the “Performance Schema Full Enabled” slider to YES to enable all available Performance Schema instruments.

Figure 2.3 Performance Schema Setup: Easy Setup

Performance Schema Setup: Easy Setup

Clicking Show Advanced provides methods to fine tune the Performance Schema instrumentation.

Figure 2.4 Performance Schema Setup: Introduction

Performance Schema Setup: Introduction

Server Variable Groupings

Variables can now be organized using custom groupings in the Status and System Variables Management tab.

To create a custom group, right-click on a variable and choose either Add to Custom Category (to create a new category), or an existing custom category.

Figure 2.5 Status And System Variables: Custom

Status And System Variables: Custom

SQL Editor Views

Additional viewing options were added for executed statements:

Result Grid

Available previously, and it remains the default view.

Figure 2.6 SQL Editor: Result Grid

SQL Editor: Result Grid

Form Editor

You can now edit records row by row in a form style editor.

Figure 2.7 SQL Editor: Form Editor

SQL Editor: Form Editor

Field Types

Displays information about the selected fields, similar to passing in --column-type-info from the command line client.

Figure 2.8 SQL Editor: Field Types

SQL Editor: Field Types

Query Stats

Query statistics are taken from the Performance Schema, and includes information about timing, temporary tables, indexes, joins, and more.

Figure 2.9 SQL Editor: Query Stats

SQL Editor: Query Stats

Home Screen Features

Several behavioral improvements were made to the MySQL Workbench Home screen, including:

  • Connection tiles can now be repositioned by using drag and drop
  • A script or model file can be dragged into a MySQL connection tile
  • The following right-click options were added to the connection tiles: Copy JDBC Connection String andCopy Connection String
  • Right-clicking a blank area in the MySQL Connections area now offers an option to create aNew Connection From Clipboard

Visual Explain

The layout changed, and additional information is now viewable by hovering over the fields. It also displays traditional EXPLAIN output in a separate tab, and the Raw Explain Data (as JSON) in another. For MySQL server 5.7+, the new “cost information” (such as “query_cost” and “sort_cost) is also utilized.

Figure 2.10 Visual Explain: Workbench 6.0

Visual Explain: Workbench 6.0
Figure 2.11 Visual Explain: Workbench 6.1

Visual Explain: Workbench 6.1

Table Inspector

View table information, similar to the Schema Inspector. This also has a simpler and easier to use interface for analyzing and creating indexes for your tables.

Figure 2.12 Table Inspector

Table Inspector

Additional Client Connection Information

Additional information was added to the Client Connections tab, such as Thread ID, Parent Thread, Instrumented, and Type.

Figure 2.13 Client Connections: MySQL Workbench 6.0

Client Connections: MySQL Workbench 6.0
Figure 2.14 Client Connections: MySQL Workbench 6.1

Client Connections: MySQL Workbench 6.1

Also, a Thread Stack view option was added by right-clicking a connection entry in the Client Connections tab and choosing View Thread Stack.

Figure 2.15 Client Connections: View Thread Stack

Client Connections: View Thread Stack

Additional Miscellaneous Additions

  • MSAA (Windows Accessibility API) support and High contrast color theme in Microsoft Windows
  • MySQL Enterprise Backup improvements
  • Improvements with general performance and overall stability

MySQL Workbench 6.1.4 GA has been released

The MySQL developer tools team announces 6.1.4  as our GA release for MySQL Workbench 6.1.

MySQL Workbench 6.1 is an upcoming major update for the official MySQL graphical development tool.
Introducing over 30 new features, this version has many significant enhancements focusing on real-time performance assessment and analysis from the SQL statement level to server internals and file IO. You can see this in additions to the SQL Editor as well as new dashboard visualization and reporting that take advantage of MySQL Server 5.6 and 5.7 Performance Schema, and enhancements to the MySQL Explain Plans.

Additionally Workbench 6.1 is leveraging work from various teammates in MySQL Engineering by introducing a schema called “SYS” that provides simplified views on Performance Schema, Information Schema, and other areas. Special thanks to the server optimizer team, server runtime team, and Mark Leith.  For Oracle DBAs MySQL SYS is similar to the V$ catalog views, and MSSQL folks its like DMVs (Dynamic Management Views).

MySQL Workbench 6.1 includes:

  • Improved drag and drop support in the Home screen and SQL Editor
  • Visual Explain 2. The Visual Explain feature was revamped and is now easier to read and interpret. You can also get the traditional tabular explain output from within the same interface.
  • Performance Dashboard. A graphical representation of some key statistics from the server status, gives you a bird’s eye view of the status of key server subsystems.
  • For advanced users, Performance Schema Instrumentation. A GUI for configuring the Performance Schema in detail, for advanced users.
  • Performance Schema based reporting. Gives insight into the operation of the server through many high-level reports.
  • New query result view. Get more information about queries you execute, such as information about the fields in your result set and key performance statistics from your query (timing, index usage, number of rows scanned, joins etc).
  • Form Editor for resultsets. In addition to the result grid, you can now edit records row by row in a form style editor.
  • Table Inspector. Similar to the Schema Inspector, view detailed information from tables. A streamlined interface for creating indexes is also included.
  • Support for the Windows accessibility API and Windows high contrast color schemes. A new high contrast theme has been introduced.
  • And more.

More than 60 enhancement requests and bugs reported by users have also been addressed, providing performance, usability and stability improvements across the board.

For the full list of bugs fixed in this revision, visit

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/relnotes/workbench/en/changes-6-1.html

For discussion, join the MySQL Workbench Forums:

http://forums.mysql.com/index.php?151

Download MySQL Workbench 6.1.4 GA now, for Windows, Mac OS X 10.6+, Oracle Linux 6, Fedora 19, Fedora 20, Ubuntu 12.04 and Ubuntu 13.10 or sources, from:

http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/tools/workbench/

In Windows, you can also use the integrated MySQL Installer to update MySQL Workbench and other MySQL products.

Quick links:

http://mysqlworkbench.org/
– Download: http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/tools/workbench/
– Bugs: http://bugs.mysql.com
– Forums: http://forums.mysql.com/index.php?151

MySQL Workbench 6.1: Updating accounts using the old (pre-4.1.1) authentication protocol

In MySQL each ‘user’ has its own password hash. To provide better security, pasword hashes were extended from 16 to 41 bytes in MySQL 4.1.

This change created a situation. If the user was created prior to version 4.1 and the server updated to a newer version, the password hash that was stored in the database is left in the old, deprecated format. This is because MySQL doesn’t store passwords in plain text so there’s no way to automatically regenerate a password hash. For this case, we consider two scenarios:
– If the secure_auth server option is disabled, you can login and update your password. You may also need to enable the allow old_password option in the Workbench advanced options tab for the connection.
– If secure_auth is enabled, you do not have possibility to log in to the database and the only thing you can do is to disable that option or log in as different user (such as root) to change the password. In this case, attempt to log on to the server may fail with message:
“ERROR 2049 (HY000): Connection using old (pre-4.1.1) authentication protocol refused (client option ‘secure_auth’ enabled)”
as in the screenshot below:

login_to_server

or, if you try log on in the Workbench, like this:

wb_login_to_server

In Workbench 6.1 an easy way to update your account to a format compatible with the new type of authentication has been added. Just log in to your account or some account that has permissions to manage other users (eg root) and go to the ‘Users and Privileges’ tab. Select the user whose account you want to update from the user list on the left. You should see ‘This account is using the pre-mysql-4.1.1 password hashing type. (…)’ in red in the lower right corner of the screen and the button [Upgrade] on the right, as the screenshot below:

upgrade_account

Enter a new or the current password and click the [Upgrade] button. After this operation, the user can login to his account without any further problems.

If you’re using a server 5.6 or later, we also offer a second way – generating a random password and marking it as expired. For this purpose, after selecting the user, leave the ‘password’ and ‘confirm a password’ fields untouched and immediately click on the [Upgrade] button. When you see the message shown in the screenshot below:

reset_to_expired

click on the [Reset to expired] button, it will generate a new random password, update your account and mark it as expired. The user will be able to log in to his account using the new password, but before being able to do anything else, they will need to change his password first.